FAQ

1. What is Regulatory Affairs?

Regulatory Affairs in a Pharmaceutical industry, is a profession which acts as the interface between the pharmaceutical industry and Drug Regulatory authorities across the world. It is mainly involved in the registration of the drug products in respective countries prior to their marketing.

2. What are the goals of Regulatory Affairs Professionals?

Protection of human health

Ensuring safety, efficacy and quality of drugs

Ensuring appropriateness and accuracy of product information

3. What are the Roles of Regulatory Affairs professionals?

Act as a liaison with regulatory agencies. Preparation of organized and scientifically valid NDA, ANDA,INDA ,MAA,DMF submissions. Ensure adherence and compliance with all the applicable cGMP, ICH, GCP, GLP guidelines, regulations and laws Providing expertise and regulatory intelligence in translating regulatory requirements into practical workable plans Advising the companies on regulatory aspects and climate that would affect their proposed activities Apart from the above main roles, there are various other roles which Regulatory Affairs professionals play

4.What is an Investigational New Drug (IND) application?

It is an application which is filled with FDA to get approval for legally testing an experimental drug on human subjects in the USA

5.What is a New Drug Application?

The NDA is the vehicle through which drug sponsors formally propose that the FDA approve a new pharmaceutical for sale and marketing in the U.S. The data gathered during the animal studies and human clinical trials of an Investigational new drug become part of the NDA In simple words, “It is an application which is filed with FDA to market a new Pharmaceutical for sale in USA” 6.What is an Abbreviated New Drug Application (ANDA)? Ans- It is an application filed with FDA, for a U.S. generic drug approval for an existing licensed medication or approved drug. In simple words, “It is an application for the approval of Generic Drugs ”

6. What is research?

Research is a way to answer a question and to gain knowledge. We use knowledge gained from research to come up with new treatments. Medical practice is different from research. The main purpose of medical practice is to care for the health and well being of patients. The main purpose of research is to test new scientific ideas or new treatments. Research may help individual participants, but this is not always the case.

7. What is a clinical trial?

Doctors and scientists at Cedars-Sinai take part in many kinds of research studies. Some research does not include living human beings. Research that includes humans is clinical research. Clinical research helps researchers understand how best to treat patients or helps them learn more about a particular condition or disease. There are many different forms of clinical research. One common form is a clinical trial. In a clinical trial, researchers test new drugs, medical devices or treatments.

Doctors and scientists at Cedars-Sinai take part in many kinds of research studies. Some research does not include living human beings. Research that includes humans is clinical research. Clinical research helps researchers understand how best to treat patients or helps them learn more about a particular condition or disease. There are many different forms of clinical research. One common form is a clinical trial. In a clinical trial, researchers test new drugs, medical devices or treatments.

Clinical trials must be conducted before a new drug, biologic, or device may be marketed in the United States. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulates clinical trials. The FDA gives investigators permission to test a new drug, biologic or device under strict regulatory conditions.

8. What is a protocol?

A protocol describes the rules to follow during the research. For example, a protocol states why it is important to study the research question and how the research team will answer the research question. A protocol also states how the research team will protect the health and well being of the research volunteers. A protocol includes information on the study procedures, medications to be used, possible risks and benefits, possible adverse events, and data analysis methods.

9. Who monitors the conduct of protocols?

Physicians, nurses, sponsors, auditors, statisticians, and federal and nonfederal regulatory bodies carefully monitor the actual conduct and safety of protocols. This means that different groups are reviewing the safety and progress of each protocol on a regular basis. If any of these groups determine that there is a concern with how the study is conducted, the study will stop.

10. Who gets to be in a study?

Each research study is different. Each study tries to find answers to a specific question. Researchers must follow strict rules to decide who may take part in research. Not everyone with the disease or problem that is being studied can take part in a research study. If your doctor thinks that you might qualify for a study, he or she may ask if you want to take part. Many patients also look for research studies on their own through websites or support groups. The Cedars-Sinai website provides information on clinical research.

To be included in research, you must agree to take part. You may drop out of a research study at any time, even if you already agreed to participate. Saying no to participating in research will not change your standard medical care at Cedars-Sinai in any way. If you have questions about participating, you may talk to your doctor or to another doctor who is not a member of the research team about your other choices.

Cedars-Sinai also conducts nonmedical or nonintervention types of research. You could be asked to participate in a study as a "normal control," you could be asked for permission to allow researchers to collect information from your medical record, or you could be asked to simply fill out a questionnaire. Cedars-Sinai conducts many research studies where patients are simply asked for permission to use their leftover surgical or tissue specimens that would otherwise be discarded.

11. What is informed consent?

Informed consent is the process that gives information to people who are thinking about taking part in research. After learning about the research, you should understand:

The purpose of the study

The procedures involved in the study

The procedures involved in the study

The rights of people who take part in research

That taking part in research is your choice

What you can do instead of taking part in the study

How the research team will give you any new information that may be learned after you decide to take part in a study that might cause you to change your mind

How the research team will give you any new information that may be learned after you decide to take part in a study that might cause you to change your mind

12. What is assent?

Research at Cedars-Sinai includes children as well as adults. The law states that children cannot make their own decision about research. We, however, feel it is important that children receive an explanation of the research and have a chance to ask questions. If your child's doctor tells you that your son or daughter must "assent" to participate, it is because we respect his or her rights as a person. "Assent" refers to the process by which we ask a child's agreement to participate. In most cases, investigators will obtain a child's assent if he or she is over the age of 7. It is important that the information shared with your child be understandable. The researcher will consider your child's age and maturity level when presenting information. Doctors and parents need to work together to help the child understand what a study involves.

Adults who cannot legally make decisions for themselves may also agree to participate through an assent process. Researchers must also obtain the consent of an individual who represents such. Investigators want to make sure that the person whose mental abilities are impaired has some understanding of what will happen to him/her and can say no if he/she so chooses.

Sometimes assent is not required. In situations where the research may be the only way to help a patient with a life-threatening illnesses, assent is not required if the research is expected to be beneficial to the individual. Even so, researchers are encouraged to discuss the research with the individual patient.

13. What are my rights as a research participant?

You have the right to not take part in a research study.

You have the right to drop out at anytime.

You have the right to be given new information about the study.

You have the right to ask questions at any time and have them answered as soon as possible.

You also have the responsibility to stay informed during your participation in a study. You should ask questions about anything you do not understand or simply want to know.

14. Careers in Regulatory Affairs

There is a wide variety of careers in the regulatory affairs field. Regulatory professionals carry titles such as:

Regulatory affairs specialist

Regulatory affairs manager

Regulatory affairs director

Compliance specialist

Food safety inspector

Clinical research associate

Director of quality assurance

These regulatory professionals play a critical role in the development and distribution of medical technological advancements and disease-free food, improving people’s health and welfare around the world.

15. What do regulatory affairs professionals do?

Because the field of global regulatory affairs spans a diverse set of disciplines, including law, economics, public policy, health, and science, the scope of a regulatory professional’s work varies. Career paths and daily responsibilities may differ based on areas of expertise, but all regulatory professionals have one goal in common: to facilitate the commercialization of safe and effective products and services. Some regulatory affairs professionals manage clinical studies or develop marketing approval policies, while others design labels for food- and drug-related products.

One of the most common titles in the industry is regulatory affairs specialist. These specialists analyze new and existing regulations in relation to an organization’s products or processes. They also review marketing, legal, and technical documentation, including case files and clinical research reports, to assess compliance with global regulatory agency policies, regulations, and standards. Regulatory affairs specialists may also recommend courses of remediation to help companies achieve the necessary levels of compliance. Acting as a liaison between manufacturing organizations and federal agencies, they may be responsible for submitting critical regulatory documents, with the goal of approval for sale and distribution.

Senior-level regulatory professionals often make strategic business decisions that have significant legal and financial repercussions. A large part of a regulatory affairs role, at all levels, is to interpret and communicate these implications to a diverse set of internal and external stakeholders.

16. What’s the job outlook and market demand?

As the regulatory affairs discipline plays an integral role in global health, food safety, and medical innovation, it’s no surprise that the job market is growing. As new and developing industries become increasingly regulated, the demand for additional and specialized regulatory expertise will increase.

17. Where do regulatory affairs professionals work?

As of 2018, 73 percent of regulatory professionals work directly in a regulated industry, such as pharmaceuticals, medical devices, biotechnology, or food science. Just under eight percent choose a consultative path, gaining employment at legal, research, or marketing firms. The remainder are employed by a mix of academic institutions, clinical research organizations, government agencies, hospitals, and healthcare organizations. With so many options, regulatory professionals can choose to work in organizations of any size, ranging from 10 to 10,000 employees.

18. What do regulatory affairs professionals earn?

Much like the setting and scope of a regulatory job, regulatory salaries vary, depending on job function, previous regulatory experience, seniority, geographic market, and highest earned degree